nScreenMedia Understanding media delivery in a multi-screen world

Whitepapers


Winning OTT video subs

 

 

 

 


Winning and Retaining OTT Video Subscribers

Author: Colin Dixon

Release: Q3 2014
- ‘Frictionless’ approach gives Netflix 7 to 1 advantage in Scandinavia
- Analysis finds that outdated business models sank HBO Nordic’s chance for success
According to new analysis from nScreenMedia, the reason Netflix has a 29% penetration in Denmark while HBO Nordic has just 4% is that each service has radically different barriers to adoption. In this free white paper, nScreenMedia looks in detail at the launch of Netflix and HBO Nordic in Scandinavia to understand how the two services could achieve such different results.

The white paper examines data which shows clearly that online video viewers simply refuse to bound by the terms of traditional pay-TV. Any barrier placed in their path, such as a login or complicated user interface, will result in them moving on to the next service.

Service providers must strive to lower the barriers for consumers to get the content they crave, while at the same time keeping the service profitable and secure. The white paper shows that many of the traditional pay TV approaches don’t work on the web. There are, however, simple things service providers can do now to address many of the issues.

Download White Paper


Screen Sights Whitepaper

 

 

 

 


nScreen nSights: View My Video

Consumer Digital Media Consumption

Author: Colin Dixon

Release: Q2 2014

Consumers are spending a lot more time online watching video. This report examines how this is impacting the balance of consumption between the video sources commonly available; including pay and free TV, DVD and Blu-ray discs, digital media, free and paid Internet streaming services and home videos. The report looks at the group of consumers that have cut the cord, assessing how happy they are with their decision and what they miss the most about pay-TV. Video enabled device preferences are also presented.

After reading the report you will know which video services consumers prefer, and how strong that preference is. You will also know the likelihood that a cord cutter will return to the pay-TV fold and how operators are best placed to woo them back. You will know which devices consumers prefer to use for their video viewing. There is a special section that focuses on behaviors of the millennnials (aka Gen Y.)

This report draws on a recent survey of 1000 U.S. broadband users.

Download View My Video

Multiscreen Becomes Mainstream

 

 


Multiscreen Becomes Mainstream

Five Ways Multiscreen is Changing the TV Business

Author: Colin Dixon

Release: Q2 2014

There are already many native multiscreen delivery services, such as Hulu Plus in the U.S. and Maxdome in Germany. And operators are beginning to adapt to the new environment with TV-Everywhere services. However, with just 6.5% of US pay-TV subscribers using their operator’s TV-Everywhere portal more than once a week, it’s clear there is still a long way to go.

I spoke with five industry insiders about how multiscreen delivery of video is reshaping the business of television. In this paper I focus on five of the main challenges that came up during those conversations:

  • How an operator can manage the disruption caused by over-the-top services
  • How multiscreen delivery is killing family viewing
  • Coping with the huge number of video files multiscreen delivery entails
  • The tension between ubiquity and utility in TV app development
  • Why advertisers need to look to apps and not just chase premium inventory

There is a section dedicated to each of the topics with a discussion of the challenges and description of the some of the opportunities.

Click for access to free white paper

nScreen nSights: Store My Stuff

nScreen nSights: Store My Stuff

Consumer Digital Media Storage

Author: Colin Dixon

Release: Q1 2014

Consumers are transitioning from using physical media, such as DVDs and video tapes, to digital media, including MP3s and UltraViolet movies. This report examines this transition through the lens of storage. Digital media must be stored somewhere, and should be backed up. We asked consumers what storage mediums they use for each of the following media types: digital photos, ripped and downloaded music and movies, and home videos. The storage mediums examined in the report include: PCs, smartphones, tablets, external hard drives, social media sites, cloud storage and NAS.

After reading the report you will know how quickly consumers are transitioning to digital media in each of the categories covered. You will also know which storage mechanisms consumers prefer, how many copies of their digital media they keep, and how much storage they think they will need in the future. There is also a special section that focuses on behaviors of the millennnials (aka Gen Y.)

This report draws on a recent survey of 1000 U.S. broadband users.

Click here for access to this free report

Second Screen Apps for TV

Second-Screen Apps for TV

What downloads and usage teach us about market maturity

Authors: Colin Dixon & Herve Utheza

Release: Q1 2013

With the explosive growth of tablets and smartphones, consumers are naturally using the devices to deepen their engagement with television. From Netflix to Zeebox, Shazam to Viggle, a host of apps have sprung up to service every need of the television viewer. While many app providers talk about their successes, it’s much less clear which apps are hits and which are misses. This report looks at downloads and usage data to expose the winners and losers in the burgeoning new market for second screen TV apps.

Click here for access to this Whitepaper

Television as an App

Television as an App

Taming the Device Fragmentation Problem

Author: Colin Dixon

Release: Q2 2013

For content providers, operators and aggregators, delivering to multiple screens is the new reality. Unfortunately, it is far from simple to reach every customer on their device of choice. There is huge fragmentation between app platforms, forcing app developers to create many, many different versions of their app to reach just a few of the major CE manufacturer devices.

This white paper delves into this problem in detail, looking for potential solutions to the app proliferation problem. In particular, the paper examines how the cloud approach to app development holds the promise of being the ultimate answer to problem.

Click here for access to this Whitepaper


Virtual Operator Advantage

The Virtual Operator Advantage

Five Reasons Online Pay-TV will Ultimately Win Out

Author: Colin Dixon

Release: Q3 2013

Just two years ago it would have been unthinkable to launch full pay-TV services over the Internet. Today, with cable stalwarts such as HBO and TNT delivering their quality TV shows direct to consumers over the web, it is clear that the Internet has become an extremely capable television platform.

This paper explores some of the advantages of becoming a virtual operator (vPop.) The author spoke with 4 industry insiders about areas where virtual operators may have an advantage. The paper explores 5 of the main topics that came up during those conversations:

  • The costs of running a virtual pay-TV service
  • Why and all-IP architecture provides an advantage
  • The benefits of using the latest codec technology
  • Multi-screen service delivery
  • The advantages of the platform for a channel provider

Click here for access to this Whitepaper

Handling the Explosion of Online Video

Handling the Explosion of Online Video

Why Caching is the Key to Containing Costs

Author: Colin Dixon

Release: Q4 2013

Keeping up with consumer video bandwidth demands, for ISPs, feels like a sysiphusian task.  Unfortunately, much of this bandwidth is wasted carrying exactly the same video to many different viewers. This wasteful and expensive problem is increasingly drawing the attention of ISPs as they struggle to contain costs, maintain quality and scale their networks to handle the increasing load. One solution in particular looks like it may hold the key to solving this intractable problem: caching.

This paper discusses how caching can help broadband networks meet the ever increasing video demands of consumers. To put this topic in perspective, the paper starts with a discussion of how much bandwidth is required to deliver video to primetime sized audiences, and how caching helps reduce the bandwidth required. The discussion shifts to how partner caching and transparent caching differ in their approach to reducing the burden of video on operator networks.

Click here for access to this Whitepaper